Mike in front of Auke Bay in Juneau, AK and the UAS Anderson Building (Navarro Lab location).

Mike in front of Auke Bay in Juneau, AK and the UAS Anderson Building (Navarro Lab location).

Abbreviated Biography:

Dr. Michael Navarro is an Assistant Professor in Marine Fisheries at the University of Alaska Southeast. As a biological and fisheries oceanographer, he studies chemical, physical, geological and human effects on coastal fishery species and food webs. He also is the program coordinator for the UAS/UAF B.Sc. in Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, concentration in Fisheries Science.

Email: monavarro@alaska.edu, Phone: (907) 796-6293

Curriculum Vitae

ResearchGate

  At the National Academy of Sciences, Kavli Frontiers in Sciences Conference in Newport Beach (June 2017), Navarro was selected as a distinguished young scientist and gave a presentation, "Range extension into the Gulf of Alaska of a keystone species,  Doryteuthis opalescens,  and implications for a new fishery."

 At the National Academy of Sciences, Kavli Frontiers in Sciences Conference in Newport Beach (June 2017), Navarro was selected as a distinguished young scientist and gave a presentation, "Range extension into the Gulf of Alaska of a keystone species, Doryteuthis opalescens, and implications for a new fishery."

 

Full Biography:

The ocean plays a central role in the state of Alaska’s ability to be a world leader for sustainable seafood production. The Navarro Lab works to inform the seafood industry, seafood dependent communities, and marine resource policy makers regarding the impacts of oceanographic changes. At the University of Alaska Southeast (UAS), the Navarro Lab focuses on local seafood security research opportunities aimed to keep fisheries sustainable for families and ecosystems. Lab members works to keep policy makers knowledgeable so that their constituents can choose the type of balance they want between commerce and environmental trade offs.

The current lab projects include:

-Climate Change Impacts on Seafood Security

- Impacts of Geomorphology Dynamics on Subtidal Sandy Inhabitants

-Community Science

Research Record:

Navarro has published several of his studies about marine fisheries and fishery species. In Santa Monica Bay, USA, Michael has shown that that recreational fishers interact with marine mammals (Navarro and Bearzi 2007). Working with recreational fishers, he showed that fishers impact sea lion behavior and vice versa yet this interaction is not present with inshore dolphin behavior (Navarro and Bearzi 2007). In the Southern California Bight, USA Michael demonstrated that lead (Pb) is found in highest abundance along the coast next to dense human-populated watersheds (human impact). Further, he showed that seawater-derived Pb can be incorporated into the ear bone analogs, or statoliths, of a coastal marine invertebrate (Navarro 2009) implying that pollution impacts acquired by marine life at their birth site can be tracked to their natal origins. As a fisheries biologist, Navarro worked with commercial fishers under California state mandates and reported the 2007 status of the state's most valuable and largest fishery, the market squid fishery (Navarro 2008). As a fisheries and biological oceanographer, Michael investigated the consequences of changing environmental conditions on market squid- Doryteuthis opalescens- spawning site selection and embryogenesis (Navarro 2014). In nature, Michael confirmed through empirical study that squid spawn in a "conveyor belt" of events throughout the year. Further, through oceanographic observations in nature, he found that squid embryos are exposed to substantially variable seawater conditions with the largest variability being driven by the tides (Navarro 2014-Chapter 2, Navarro et al. 2018).  By conducting laboratory research, Michael found that seawater with low pH and [O2] can negatively impact squid embryos both in terms of their development (Navarro et al. 2016) and statolith biogeochemistry (Navarro et al. 2014). Currently, the Navarro Lab is investigating ocean warming impacts on forage species in Southeast Alaska.

 As part of the Ocean Leadership Consortium, 2015 Marine Geosciences Leadership Symposium. Navarro participated in efforts to inform congressional members of the importance of science funding. 

As part of the Ocean Leadership Consortium, 2015 Marine Geosciences Leadership Symposium. Navarro participated in efforts to inform congressional members of the importance of science funding. 

 Navarro, Chief Scientist, for a historic oceanographic expedition (2010) off the coast of San Diego aboard the  R/V Sproul  .  This oceanographic cruise was the first to be crewed by a team of high-school students and was part of the SIO 'Focus on the Future' program.

Navarro, Chief Scientist, for a historic oceanographic expedition (2010) off the coast of San Diego aboard the R/V Sproul .  This oceanographic cruise was the first to be crewed by a team of high-school students and was part of the SIO 'Focus on the Future' program.

Training Opportunities:

The Navarro Lab is committed to investing large amounts of time toward infrastructure development to include Americans from all backgrounds, because doing so moves the field of science forward. Lab efforts are in line with those designed to increase diversification of the USA workforce made by National Science Foundation, and the National Academy of Sciences.

Undergraduate Courses Taught at UA Southeast:

  • Biological Oceanography (F17)
  • Fundamentals of Biology I (F16)
  • Fundamentals of Biology II (S18)
  • Genetics (F16, F17, F18)
  • Global Trends in Fisheries (S17)
  • Introduction to Marine Fisheries (S17, S18)
  • Independent Undergraduate Research in Oceanography (S17, F17, S17)

Upcoming Undergraduate Courses at UA Southeast:

  • Biological Oceanography (F19)
  • Communicating Science (F18)
  • Genetics (F18)
  • Global Trends in Fisheries (S19)
  • Introduction to Marine Fisheries (S19)
  • Independent Undergraduate Research in Oceanography (F18, S19)

Pre-College Courses Taught at UC San Diego:

  • Invertebrate Zoology (Sum11)

 

    Educational Background:

    Michael was trained as a biological oceanographer by Dr. Lisa Levin at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (Ph.D. 2014), as a fisheries biologist by Dale Sweetnam at the California Department of Fish and Game (now the California Department of Fish and Wildlife), as a marine ecologist and malacologist by Dr. Danielle Zacherl at California State University Fullerton (CSUF; M.Sc. 2009), and as a marine mammalogist by Dr. Maddalena Bearzi at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA; B.Sc. 2000).

     Mike's first snorkel at Santa Catalina Channel Island, 1993.

    Mike's first snorkel at Santa Catalina Channel Island, 1993.

    Personal Background:

    Michael grew up near along the coast of urbanized ocean next to the commerce center, the Port of Los Angeles (Long Beach, USA). As a youth, it was easy for him to see the jobs the port created as well as the all too often unplanned consequences of local pollution into the ocean.  While Michael was growing up in Long Beach, residents could not use many "renewable" natural resources as they once did. People generally avoided immersion into the gentle waters along the shores of Long Beach and warnings were regularly posted stating the seafood was unsafe to eat because they were heavily laden with pollutants and considered hazardous to human health. Yet despite these environmental insults, Michael was aware that pockets of spectacular marine life persisted as well as select areas of shoreline safe for human contact. As a youth exploring Santa Catalina Channel Island, he saw solutions towards better living (Catalina is part Los Angeles County, < 30 miles to some of the most dense populations of people in the USA). He has since dedicated his life conducting research that facilitates sustainable jobs for those that make their livelihood utilizing ocean living resources (keeping the "renewable" resources renewable) as well as research to keep the ocean fit for production of sustainable harvests. 

    Mike enjoys spending his free time finding new ways to surround himself with water (newest includes exploring ice caves). You can often find him hiking among the many trails in Juneau's temperate rainforest or exploring Juneau's unique underwater environments. Although he hasn't yet surfed at Lena Point, he aims to do so in the near future.

     Navarro holding  Aplysia californica  (CA sea hare) nearshore Santa Catalina Channel Island, 1993. Anne Maben took him and her other students to the Catalina Island Marine Institute as part of her marine biology course taught at Long Beach Polytechnic High School.

    Navarro holding Aplysia californica (CA sea hare) nearshore Santa Catalina Channel Island, 1993. Anne Maben took him and her other students to the Catalina Island Marine Institute as part of her marine biology course taught at Long Beach Polytechnic High School.

     Ice caves of the rapidly receding Mendenhall Glacier, Juneau, AK.

    Ice caves of the rapidly receding Mendenhall Glacier, Juneau, AK.